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Re: Throttling of unlimited 4g

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Let's correct some of this math.  When Verizon ended unlimited data in July 2011 only 36% of 89.7 million has smartphones. Or 32.3 million. Now while most had unlimited data at that time not all did, but let's assume 100% anyway. Now if one assumed all 32.3 million unlimited data customers are still with Verizon and still on unlimited data( unrealistic ) since Verizon now has 98.6 million customers that percentage would be at best 32.8%. Of course we know it's not close to that.

As of the end of quarter 2( June 30) 75% of phones where smartphones. Also 55% Were on More  Everything. As we all know More Everything doesn't have unlimited data. So the unlimited data customers are part of the 45% that are Nationwide pricing. So that's 44.4 million. If we assume that Nationwide has the same % of smartphones. That's 33.3 million smartphones. Of course it would be ridiculous to assume all 33.3 million are on unlimited data. Even if we generously assume 75% are we get 25 million. 25 million of 98.6 million is 25.4%. So at best it's 25%. Also Verizon says it has 20 million customers with 3G only smartphone which have ALWAYS been throttled. So this new policy doesn't even affect them. Assuming 45% of those 20 million or 9 million are on Nationwide, that leaves at best 16 million 4G smartphones or 16% that would be on unlimited data and affected by this new policy. And that's very generous estimate.

Also on this topic all 3 other carriers have the same sort of policy toward unlimited data users. YES even T-Mobile. Second if the FCC really wants to prevent Verizon form "throttling" unlimited data customers Verizon can simply kill off unlimited data. There isn't any rule or law that can force Verizon to keep unlimited data. Is that a better solution? I wish they do it but I don't think it's better for those on unlimited.

Also let's stop over reacting. First you'd have to be in the top 5%. Even if you believed that 33% still had unlimited data then you're admitting only 15% of all unlimited data customers would even be under this policy. Even if you're in the top 5% you are only "throttled" if a tower is congested and only while the tower is congested. It's not even a permanent throttle. One could use 500 GB a month and never be throttled if the towers they use are never congested. So for basically a less than 1% chance of getting throttled people are getting their knickers in a bind.

Personally I hope the FCC pushes the issue and Verizon says F It and gets rid of unlimited data. Where are these unlimited data customers going to go then? To Sprint or T-Mobile who have the SAME policy as they were complaining about Verizon was wanting to do?