Going to have to disagree on some points. Verizon customers should have better security options, not less because of the needs the few. Yes, it should depend on their device type, but people s... Ver más...
Going to have to disagree on some points. Verizon customers should have better security options, not less because of the needs the few. Yes, it should depend on their device type, but people should be able to integrate current biometric or hardware security options into their online accounts. Especially true where phone numbers are hijacked via spoofers on a daily basis. Everyone has a phone number associated with even a data only plan. Someone using keyloggers and other spyware on another person's phone (including iPhones) can hijack the PIN code. During the time of a new device being set up or reset, any hacker can take advantage of vulnerabilities (like there temporarily being no PIN, fingerprint or face ID) to infect a phone. It's happened and does happen. Verizon CSR's can see a phone's EIMI, so the customer does need to know it. It's up to Verizon CSR's to validate that the phone to EIMI are a match before proceeding with a reset. I had a CSR do this in the past. It is possible to do. If someone wants less security due to their disabilities etc. that's on them. But the majority of customers should be able to access and take advantage of more heightened security if they choose.
I still have a concern. I see where I can create a nickname as a login, but if having multiple login options is still available the account is still vulnerable. Example: if I create a nickname ... Ver más...
I still have a concern. I see where I can create a nickname as a login, but if having multiple login options is still available the account is still vulnerable. Example: if I create a nickname on my account, someone can still bypass not knowing that nickname with my phone number or email. To tighten up a customer account, the customer should be able to disable logging in with the phone or email, and only use the nickname. Someone else shouldn't be able to a password reset because they know a customer phone and email, but not the nickname. If they want a reset, they should be required to call in for a reset. Customer service should validate that the number being called matches the EIMI number registered to the account. That way Customer Service is not giving a reset to someone spoofing a customer phone number using VOIP (like Vonage), etc. This is how good credit monitoring companies operate. Seriously, Verizon is a utility where our account information is a vital link to so many other utilities and financial services. More should be done to cut down fraud, especially when the Fraud department does not receive infected phones for analysis or believe customers when they say they've been hacked. 
I looked over my account profile and I can create a user name. The catch is that on the login, the option to bypass that using the phone number is completely available. Verizon needs to remove ... Ver más...
I looked over my account profile and I can create a user name. The catch is that on the login, the option to bypass that using the phone number is completely available. Verizon needs to remove the option to use the phone number. That's how vindictive, or opportunistic, people can get in. Even Apple's iCloud was recently hacked. That's why a utility company like Verizon should be offering more secure logins for customers that do not rely on SMS 2FA, but something more difficult to spoof.
One more thing: Would it be possible for customers to see their account login history? Am I missing where to find that option if it's currently available?
When I came back to Verizon 5 years ago, I had to make my account with my phone number and not a nickname like with my old account.
Thank you for understanding where I am coming from. Please consider what Salisbury contributed to the conversation: Back in the day, Verizon used nicknames instead of account holder phone numbe... Ver más...
Thank you for understanding where I am coming from. Please consider what Salisbury contributed to the conversation: Back in the day, Verizon used nicknames instead of account holder phone numbers for logins. I agree this enables more security as well. Awhile back my hayseed bank did the same thing: switching from numeric user IDs to nicknames, in addition to 2FA. This makes it more difficult for someone to compromise customer accounts when they don't know the nickname plus the password. You used to do it, please go back to this login process in addition to improved 2FA options. What would be the turnaround time for Verizon security to implement hardware/biometric enhanced security? And switching back to nicknames not phone numbers during login?
I just changed to "Enhanced Authentication". I would still prefer biometrics and/or hardware security keys. A hardware key is something that only I carry on my person, and generates very long cod... Ver más...
I just changed to "Enhanced Authentication". I would still prefer biometrics and/or hardware security keys. A hardware key is something that only I carry on my person, and generates very long codes. The PIN option is only 4 digits. If someone knows you well enough, they'll eventually crack the 4 digits. So Enhanced Authentication adds a whopping 2 extra digits for a total of 6. Sorry, Verizon, still not impressed. I just switched to Apple because the biometrics are better than Android (I kept redoing my fingerprints on the Galaxy S8 because they'd fail over time.) Many apps out there are allowing for Apple ID fingerprint or face authentication. My Yubikey is still my favorite because it's physical hardware that can generate 20 plus number sequences. Come on, Verizon, as you can see, I'm not the only one requesting non-numeric authentication via SMS or email. Gotta step up that game.
Has Verizon considered enabling biometric or security key options to increase customer account security? In a situation where a customer account gets hacked because the problem person has your s... Ver más...
Has Verizon considered enabling biometric or security key options to increase customer account security? In a situation where a customer account gets hacked because the problem person has your social security number, or gained access to your pin, how else can a customer protect their information? Like a former employer or coworker, or hackers? Even when password and PIN changes occur, a person can still claim to be you because of a sequence of numbers. Why not security keys or biometrics? I currently use a security key on my laptop and biometrics on my mobile devices. When will Verizon consider utilizing these features?
I do have a concern: I use the app on both Android and iOS. Adding a number to the spam list is very cumbersome on both platforms. You have to add the number freehand in both, and when you switc... Ver más...
I do have a concern: I use the app on both Android and iOS. Adding a number to the spam list is very cumbersome on both platforms. You have to add the number freehand in both, and when you switch windows to review the number you want to add from your call history, it gets zeroed out in the Caller Name ID apps. If you don't remember all 10 digits, or write them down elsewhere, you're hindered by not being able to access the number from the phone's call history. I can't seem to do a cut-n-paste either. If the app developers could make the simple change of being able to add from the call history, that would earn the apps an extra star rating from me. Question: Does adding numbers to the spam list on the app eventually add them to collective database?
From what I have seen, changing numbers does not slow down spammers. If I consider a change, it will be for reasons other than spammers, and not for some time to come. It's been more than coin... Ver más...
From what I have seen, changing numbers does not slow down spammers. If I consider a change, it will be for reasons other than spammers, and not for some time to come. It's been more than coincidence that spammers have changed their calling method since subscribing to Caller Name ID. I will add that the number of calls has decreased. Some naysayers have posted the subscription not being worth the fee, but our lines are much quieter now. At the same time, I do report clusters of numbers from the same area to the FTC complaint site. The combination has had the biggest impact of reducing the clustered calls.
Hey, VZW Support. I subscribed to Caller Name ID. The apps are set to medium spam filter, and now the spammers are calling using No Caller ID, No Number. Some leave a voicemail, most do not. ... Ver más...
Hey, VZW Support. I subscribed to Caller Name ID. The apps are set to medium spam filter, and now the spammers are calling using No Caller ID, No Number. Some leave a voicemail, most do not. Are spammers able to detect a subscription to anti-spam services? Or are they simply savvy to circumventing the straight to voicemail process by going NCID-NN? Some are getting the hint, others are circumventing the subscription service SOP. But it's still 6-10 spammers per day on one line. I don't want to max out the setting because I don't have every trunk line of businesses I have a relationship added into my contact list.
Hey Verizon Support! I have a question regarding Caller Name ID service: Occasionally I will get an Unknown Caller from a medical office that is legitimate. How do I allow Unknown Callers to go ... Ver más...
Hey Verizon Support! I have a question regarding Caller Name ID service: Occasionally I will get an Unknown Caller from a medical office that is legitimate. How do I allow Unknown Callers to go through? I don't want to miss important calls because I subscribed to Caller Name ID. Also, I called a number back just to get them to stop. They said that "They only call numbers of people who filled out a form online requesting a phone call." So I did a look up online of the number. They are scammers! They don't have a website to even see if there is a form, etc. Is this a new technique by scammers to cover their back sides by saying they are calling Fred Flintstone because he filled out an online form with our phone number? I would really like to know if this type of spam calling is being done to others.
Good response! We basically pay to rent these numbers, and like a vehicle registration, the number we are assigned should be tied in much tighter to our accounts. The most important tie in shou... Ver más...
Good response! We basically pay to rent these numbers, and like a vehicle registration, the number we are assigned should be tied in much tighter to our accounts. The most important tie in should be the IMEI, or serial number, on our phone. If it doesn't match, it shouldn't be allowed to make a call. Most other posters are saying VOIP systems are being used to spoof and spam. Next question: Is it considered identity theft if someone is using your phone number as a callback on online forms? Say, insurance quote and mortgage-type sites? Someone is maliciously misusing a phone number (which they DO NOT pay for) to spam businesses as well as flood the victim's phone. For now, I'll be signing up for CallerNameID and Robokiller subscriptions.
As much as I use YouTube, I have noticed the same thing: There are tons of videos out there teaching how to hack someone's phone, plus how to spoof. Accepting advertising money for shady app/s... Ver más...
As much as I use YouTube, I have noticed the same thing: There are tons of videos out there teaching how to hack someone's phone, plus how to spoof. Accepting advertising money for shady app/software developers is a new low though. Since I'm in California, and endlessly frustrated by hacking and spoofing personally affecting me, Google (and it's affiliates) completely ignore California privacy and identity protection laws that they are supposed to uphold. Take note of that, Verizon! Here's what the FCC says regarding the Caller ID spoofing law of 2009: Under the Truth in Caller ID Act , FCC rules prohibit anyone from transmitting misleading or inaccurate caller ID information with the intent to defraud, cause harm or wrongly obtain anything of value. Anyone who is illegally spoofing can face penalties of up to $10,000 for each violation. I understand many of these spoofers are located outside of the United States, and therefore difficult to catch and prosecute. But that's why I noted that neither government agency has an online reporting feature for victims of spoofing, especially revenge spoofing where a person's number is targeted to solicit sales quotes etc from legitimate businesses. As long as companies, like Google, don't enforce the laws they are required by their home state to uphold, companies like Verizon, etc will keep running in circles with their Caller ID software etc. It's like plugging one hole in a breaching dam with a thousand other holes.
Over the past few weeks, one of my phone lines has been slammed with calls from businesses "returning calls from someone named ***." I have seen some threads with responses from Verizon that th... Ver más...
Over the past few weeks, one of my phone lines has been slammed with calls from businesses "returning calls from someone named ***." I have seen some threads with responses from Verizon that they are working with the FCC to curb call spoofing. Is it really happening? When I go to the FTC and FCC websites, both of their online complaint forms do not have the option to complain about being the victim of spoofing. So I am stuck talking to a live person on the phone. I have a case number with the FTC right now. It took some convincing to get it. If Verizon could also convince these agencies to update their online complaint forms to include victims of spoofing, that would be helpful. From what I am seeing, it's not illegal to spoof someone's number as long as no other laws are being broken (mainly, no one is getting physically hurt). Why doesn't spoofing fall under identity theft? Consider this situation: When a VZW customer opens an account and obtains a new line and phone number, they are leasing that number from VZW. That number is a unique identifier that is tied to that customer account, and any other relevant personal information. To me, these unique identifiers (either in long or short term possession) are like your social security number, or a leased car's registration to a specific individual. When those numbers are used to commit a crime (fraud), that person registered to the unique identifier are held responsible until they can prove their innocence. That's how I got a case number from the FTC: I didn't want to be blamed for businesses getting spammed with one of my numbers. My only back up is my call history that VZW has on record. Shouldn't apps like Burner be denied the ability to generate numbers that are already in service? Before the digital age it was almost impossible to get someone else's number because of how the numbering system worked. It's the technology that needs to be reined in.
I am having the same problem with one of my lines. I mean an avalanche of calls. I tried finding solutions online, and neither the FCC and FTC have an online complaint form for those who are th... Ver más...
I am having the same problem with one of my lines. I mean an avalanche of calls. I tried finding solutions online, and neither the FCC and FTC have an online complaint form for those who are the victims of vindictive spoofing. So, I called the FTC and after some dialog with a worker, I stated I didn't want to be falsely accused and punished as a spoofer. She, in turn, opened up a case for me. She gave me a case number. She also said that when a business called asking for the spoofer to give them the case number and report their experience to the FTC. They also wanted me to call the FCC with the case number and start a case with them as well. We still get calls from businesses asking for the spoofer. Today, we asked if the business had a recording of this spoofer's voice. Sadly, no, but we asked anyway. Maybe someone will. The other issue, besides VOIP spoofing, is the wealth of bad apps on Goo(Don't Be Evil)gle's Play Store. I am sure there are garbage apps in the Apple Store, but not in the same quantity. The steps I am starting to take, and hopefully you and others can too, is demand online forms for spoofing victims. Especially when you're getting "return calls" that you didn't initiate. Report any bad apps you find online. Most of these tech companies are based in California and held to California laws about wiretapping and identity theft. Get to know them, and quote them to get some action taken. 1. Make a complaint with the FTC and get a case number. 2. Give the case number to the FCC. 3. Report apps promoting spoofing as illegal. ¡Buena suerte!
vzw_customer_support​ This issue still isn't resolved. I'm hoping it was not marked as such. Am I stuck with this phone until August? Will there be a GPS fix in the future?
vzw_customer_support​ Looks like you misread my scenario wrong. I changed the SIM card on Wednesday. At the Verizon store, the Amazon app located me in Alpine, CA which is 150 miles away. Th... Ver más...
vzw_customer_support​ Looks like you misread my scenario wrong. I changed the SIM card on Wednesday. At the Verizon store, the Amazon app located me in Alpine, CA which is 150 miles away. The sales rep tried justifying the error as Amazon showing the location of the nearest Amazon distribution center. If that was the case, I would have been seeing the one 35 miles from me, not 150. Today, while sitting in my favorite fast food parking lot, I was on their website and received an error that my GEO location could not be found. Also, I had to force a location update to find another retailer "near me." So, the SIM update is a failure. The sales reps at 2 Verizon stores say these see GPS errors. They all had good guesses, but can't give me the technical reason it happens. Except that it's more common on Samsung because they take forever delivering the latest Android OS updates. (^^ I didn't mean to upload the same image twice.) Looks like I'm stuck with this S8 for several months until I'm eligible for the upgrade. I'm still hoping someone can give me a more technical information as to why this happens and a solid fix to this problem.
Hypothetical situation: I get the new SIM card from the store today, and it seems to fix the problem. Then after awhile I get the atypical spam texts or phone calls and the GPS problem starts ... Ver más...
Hypothetical situation: I get the new SIM card from the store today, and it seems to fix the problem. Then after awhile I get the atypical spam texts or phone calls and the GPS problem starts all over again. What will VZW do to resolve the problem? That's what happened back in August 2017. I'm just expecting a replay of the same situation.
vzw_customer_support​ I installed the Repair Utility and ran it. I also did a full factory reset with no restore...and it did nothing. The problem persists. Do I go to the nearest Verizon s... Ver más...
vzw_customer_support​ I installed the Repair Utility and ran it. I also did a full factory reset with no restore...and it did nothing. The problem persists. Do I go to the nearest Verizon store for a replacement SIM card?