cancelar
Mostrar resultados para
Busca en su lugar
Quisiste decir:
Highlighted

Re: Encrypted Bootloaders, The Law and Your Rights

Expert

Does any other carrier run their voice and data on the same block C frequencies?

I'm most definitely NOT a VZW employee. If a post answered your question, please mark it as the answer.

0 Likes
Highlighted

Re: Encrypted Bootloaders, The Law and Your Rights

Sr. Member

The current chips don't even allow it afaik.  So eventhough AT&T's lte network is in the 700MHz range it still won't work with Verizon phones.  Qualcomm apparently has a solution but Verizon isn't too fond of that idea.

Highlighted

Re: Encrypted Bootloaders, The Law and Your Rights

Miembro

TheDiabolicaL1 wrote:

I've talked to Samsung and they are unaware of this "developers edition" ...

http://www.samsung.com/us/mobile/cell-phones/SCH-I535MBCVZW

I guess like how Verizon reps don't know everything about what's going on within Verizon, it seems Samsung reps don't know everything going on within Samsung. Likely a training gap, or communication gap, or both.

Highlighted

Re: Encrypted Bootloaders, The Law and Your Rights

Expert

It is totally related to your whole block C discussion.

I'm most definitely NOT a VZW employee. If a post answered your question, please mark it as the answer.

0 Likes
Highlighted

Re: Encrypted Bootloaders, The Law and Your Rights

Sr. Member

TheDiabolicaL1 wrote:

Simply, Verizons actions after the point of sale.

I currently have a defective device.  I am being told that if I swap out my S3 for another S3 that it uses what's left of my 14 day guarantee and eliminates my option to step into a different phone if my second S3 fails to work correctly as well unless I purchase it for full retail, or purchase it used.

Apparently, there is no delineation between Warranty Replacement and simply not liking the device. 

Personally, I think it's poor business practice.

More to the point, I fail to see why it makes a difference that I would want to switch this phone out to a different carrier.  The reasons are irrelevant. The fact is, I cannot take my device to a different carrier because of Verizons software check that takes place when the phone is booted up.

It's well known flashing any other carriers official software "bricks" the phone.  This prohibits my ability to use said phone on any other carrier which is written into the law as explicitly prohibited.

  All I see is you posting arguments about Verizon restricting the bootloader, you think their 14 day policy is flawed, this is garbage, etc, etc. If you hate Verizon so much, why did you "CHOOSE" to use their service? And I want to say again, it was YOUR CHOICE to use Verizon. From what I hear, the only carrier that is restricting the bootloader of the Galaxy S3 is Verizon. Why did you not choose another carriers network services for that phone?

0 Likes
Highlighted

Re: Encrypted Bootloaders, The Law and Your Rights

No.  It is irrelevant. I'm not questioning who to take the phone to.  I'm questioning my ability to do so.

0 Likes
Highlighted

Re: Encrypted Bootloaders, The Law and Your Rights

Líder Sénior

Go ahead and bring it up with the FTC. They'll tell you what I have told you. Until Verizon moves over to VoLTE they are not in violation.

0 Likes
Highlighted

Re: Encrypted Bootloaders, The Law and Your Rights

I had a reasonable expectation that the device I PRE ORDERED (nearly a month before I received it in an effort to keep my unlimited data package) would arrive unlocked, just like every other carrier.  I traded up from a Droid X2, which, is also locked down.  I would not have purchased the SGS3 had I known the boot loader been locked.  That said, I like the phone but I do not agree with Verizons stance that locking the device down is warranted or reasonable.  I am waiting for an official response from Verizon on behalf of the complaint I filed with the FCC.  I am also still under contract for my Droid x2 so leaving Verizon, without paying, isn't an option.

I should make it clear that I like Verizon for what I pay them for- cellular service.  I do not appreciate them meddling with my device.  I certainly don't appreciate what I'm about to type..

My first Verizon phone was the BlackBerry Storm. Need I say more? 1st time Verizon screwed me.

My second device was a Motorola Droid X.  Encrypted bootloader and all.  #2

My third device- a Motorola Droid X2 sent to me by Assurian to replace an accidental break for the Droid X.  Locked down and forgotten.  This one really gets me though, as I still have this phone and it's hardware is fine.  It is what I upgraded from. While the software running the device leaves very much to be desired, it's hardware is functionally ok.  (Edited content to comply with VZW Community ToS).  I never went down that road as it's outside my abilities. In fact, it's hardware is very similar to a Nexus device that is currently running ICS.  Motorola and Verizon both tell me the X2 can't run ICS, however,(Edited content to comply with VZW Community ToS).  Seems to me it's perfectly capable.  #3

SGS3-  you know the story from there.

My issue with the locked boot loader is it gives Verizon explicit ability to render any device outdated via it's software even though it's hardware still functions and is perfectly capable of running these updates OS's.  By encrypting the boot-loader, Verizon can, at it's sole discretion, chose to not upgrade the device any further.  They may not want to put time or money into it and I perfectly understand that.  I really do.  Considering the device is completely out of warranty and is no longer being supported either officially or unofficially, what's the harm in letting third party developers pick up where VZW and Moto left off?  There isn't, other than the desire to sell phones.  I wouldn't have purchased my SGS3 if I had been allowed to put ICS on my X2.  Locking the boot-loader isn't about network security, or user experience.  It's about preventing you from upgrading your device pass where Verizon would like to cut it off.  Look at all those carriers who don't lock their boot-loaders.  You'll find their smartphone sales have slumped.  Verizon sees alot of upgrades from people with LOCKED DEVICES.  Not so many from unlocked though. 

You find this behavior acceptable, but my questioning the reasonableness of it and suddenly I'm the bad guy.  You guys are hilarious.

Message was edited by: Community Coordinator

Highlighted

Re: Encrypted Bootloaders, The Law and Your Rights

Líder Sénior

AT&T is running theirs at 800mhz if I remember correct. The current chips and the way they are designed it wouldn't matter. The PROBLEM is voice. The frequencies will not work CDMA vs. GSM for voice.

To the OP

The problem with CDMA if a carrier chooses not to allow a the ESN/IMEI into their database then it would never work. Which has nothing to do with block c. So you probably got a canned statement and most unlocking places for CDMA sites spoof the ESN/IMEI(which is illegal like changing the VIN of a vehicle) to one that is already in the network. They are often have bad ESNs and why they are used.

Highlighted

Re: Encrypted Bootloaders, The Law and Your Rights

The Droid Razr isn't VoLTE yet Verizon's official response to the FCC complaint was that it was to keep "customer service expectations high"  and for "network security."

If what you say is true, it seems to me Verizon would have stated that instead of justifying the reasonableness of why they encrypted the boot loader.

0 Likes