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Re: Jelly Bean 4.1

Miembro

Personally I think it's Verizon's choice to go CDMA that's causing the problem.  Since it's easier to write OS' for GSM (since it works on more carries/devices) every update requires modification to work on Verizon's network.  So once an update comes out Verizon's "vigorous testing process" is really just a game of chicken to see who will eat the cost of modifying the antenna portion of the update Google, Verizon or Samsung and the loser is us.  Personally, I feel that Verizon deciding not to conform to global standards should dictate that they should eat the costs of doing business that way.  Since Verizon/Vodafone's US Wireless Division operates at an average of a 28% profit margin, I think they can afford it just fine.

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Re: Jelly Bean 4.1

Sr. Member

That's your opinion and I have mine. That doesn't make me wrong.

My phone was just as responsive before I loaded JB.

The features, extended info in the notification bar, google now, they are not special to me.

Maybe you're just more easily impressed than I am.

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Re: Jelly Bean 4.1

Líder Sénior

Been using JB since the source was released for GSM preproduction(Google I/O). Butter is nice and it is overall pleasing to the eye. Nothing to cry home about. Difference in speed is actually 1/10 of a second at best. The transitions give an illusion that it is ferociously fast. Google Now is a glorified voice search that we've had since 2.3.0. As pool mentioned 99% of JB is a hype machine. Most of the changes benefit developers than the actual consumer.

Re: Jelly Bean 4.1

Novice

One of the heads of android os engineers at google Jean Baptiste said that there is no difference between the gsm and cdma 4.1 Jelly Bean. They are both identical and the gsm versions have been running them with no problems what so ever. The nexus S, motorola xoom (wifi), gsm Galaxy nexus in europe and the states all have 4.1 running, but verizon drags its feet. I seriously doubt they work on more than one phone at a time for updates with the time frames they seem to put these out at. They seriously need to either work with Google, or hire enough competent tech staff to get these updates out to all their phones. Updates are not some irregular fad that happens infrequently, but are apart of keeping systems in check and running phones well, that keep customers happy than having to come here every time when update comes out and we have to voice our concerns and the importance of said update.

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Re: Jelly Bean 4.1

Líder Sénior

I call major BS that JBQ has said that. There is a difference and he has explained the difference before as well as one of his employees on the project.

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Re: Jelly Bean 4.1

Líder Sénior

FYI the only time they will be the same is when you take out the proprietary bits. I believe that is what JBQ is referring to and people keep taking it out of context.

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Re: Jelly Bean 4.1

Miembro

All this being said - for me, it's also a matter of principle. Galaxy Nexus is touted as "the flagship". It is supposed to receive all updates first, WHEN MADE AVAILABLE BY GOOGLE. Whether or not ANYONE thinks these updates are significant or not is irrelevant. The biggest appeal with Android is the fact that it's MY device, and I should be able to get / install these updates when I see fit. I do not knock Verizon for service, but this carrier squabbling (Verizon isn't the only one) has got to stop. It flies directly in the face of Android's open-source, user-controlled philosophy. I don't want to have to (removed to comply with VZW Community ToS) my device to keep pace - it shouldn't have to come to that.

Message was edited by: Verizon Moderator

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Re: Jelly Bean 4.1

Líder Sénior

I said this a while back BEFORE this device came out. The Galaxy Nexus isn't Verizon's flagship device. It's a Google's flagship developers device first and foremost. These devices are sold cheap by Google to entice developers to develop for their platform. They will not stop normal consumers from buying them.

Now before the device came out I said updates are going to take a while. Qualcomm with the way they have CDMA written and licensed if there is ever a problem with the radio it has to go back to Google then Samsung then Qualcomm then Verizon and it has to repeat that process even on Sprint. Everything needs to be signed a different way. This is one of the problems with AOSP. You can't modify those files and if you do your radios won't work right unless you use hacks(See CyanogenMod for more details). GSM is a whole total different animal. Only the libraries can't be touch and everything else is Open. I ranted about the updates before the device even came out. I then realized I shouldn't care. I might as well do it myself which I have done. That's the beauty of Nexus devices. You don't even have to wait for Google(that's where some of the features come from). Google likes them then adds them in the next version including their own work.

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Re: Jelly Bean 4.1

Leader

Independent developers don't have nearly as much at stake when putting out a buggy build as Verizon does.  If things don't work for them, that's ok, if they don't work for Verizon, they have to replace devices... and that costs them money.

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Re: Jelly Bean 4.1

Leader

Open source and user-controlled are two completely different things.  Open source simply means that the OEMs don't have to pay for the rights to use Android source code and the source code is available for all.  This does not include any proprietary additions that manufacturers or carriers include, i.e. manufacturer UI (not applicable here as GNex is vanilla) and CDMA radio software.  You don't get the updates when YOU see fit, you get them when the carrier is confident they will work on their network.  They are the ones who have to replace devices that don't work and, naturally, they are trying to avoid that.