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Re: Robocalls. Why, Verizon?

kaebfly
Leader

It's a community forum, not a customer service forum. It's a place for fellow vzw customers to discuss things and try to help assist each other with limited interaction from Verizon employees. There seems to be some confusion about what a community forum is.

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Re: Robocalls. Why, Verizon?

rcschnoor
Líder Sénior

LKJjk wrote:

A few things I have to wonder about:

-   So Nomorobo does not work with any cellular phone systems or carriers.  Fine.  Understood.  Got it.   But the question still remains, and no one, including Verizon, is addressing it:   Exactly WHY does nomorobo NOT work on cellular phones, and what would it take for it to work?   Verizon's silence on the whole matter is pretty much enough of an answer for me.

Well... It IS the product of Nomorobo. It would seem that it is the responsibility of Nomorobo to change/improve its product to work with cell phone providers. I believe the WHY it does not work with cell phone providers is that none of them provide a simultaneous ring feature with their service. This is how Nomorobo intercepts the robocalls I believe. simultaneous ring is a feature of many digital landline phone providers and Nomorobo states that it must be activated before it will be able to work on a line. The fact many people give up landline based phones to go with strictly a cell phone would lead one to believe this is NOT a feature that cell phone providers would be willing to invest in.

For Nomorobo to start working with cell phone providers, it appears they will have to change/improve how they intercept these robocalls. Why should the cellphone providers foot the bill for a service provided by another company???

This is a reasonable feature for landline based providers to have as most landline phone users will ALSO have a cell phone and possibly ANOTHER landline in addition.Smiley Happy

Re: Robocalls. Why, Verizon?

LKJjk
Miembro

rcschnoor wrote:

The fact many people give up landline based phones to go with strictly a cell phone would lead one to believe this is NOT a feature that cell phone providers would be willing to invest in.

I don't follow your logic.  How do you make that conclusion?  You are suggesting that I gave up having a landline despite knowing that a solution for blocking robocalls would not work for a cell phone, and that the ability to block robocalls was therefore not important to me...  and then, by extension, it should not be a feature that cell phone providers could find adequate demand for among their customers.   That's simply not true.

I had no idea that blocking would work for one and not the other.   I gave up a landline because (1) cell phone offers mobility, which I need; (2) I don't need two phones.  I kind of doubt that many people choosing cell phone over landline consider, or are even aware,  that cell phones cannot (or will not) utilize Nomorobo to block unwanted pest calls.

rcschnoor wrote:

Why should the cellphone providers foot the bill for a service provided by another company???

Maybe the cell phone providers should "foot the bill"  for a service provided by another company simply because the cell phone providers do not, will not, or can not provide that service (which apparently so many customers would like to have) by themselves.    Why are they willing to do it for landlines, but not for cell phones?

As I understand it, finding a solution to the technical challenge of stopping unwanted robo and marketing calls is a very complex problem - which is why the FTC launched the Robocall Challenge (awarding the $50K prize in a tie to Nomorobo and another proposal) in the first place.  So if the solution that rose to the top of the submittals would require some participation in the implementation by the cell phone providers themselves, it would seem to me that this would probably be the easier "fix" than to trash the entire technological basis of Nomorobo's solution, and put the onus on Nomorobo to "change / improve" it's product, when it might be simpler for the providers to add simultaneous ringing.  Now mind you, I do not KNOW if it would be simple for the providers to add simultaneous ringing, because those providers do not answer any questions!

You make a lot of arguments to seemingly try to divert attention away from the simple fact that cell phone providers are turning a deaf ear to the desires of their customers.  What I wonder is why they will not just answer the question themselves? 

In response to Kaebfly's comment about a "community" forum, again, I ask, why have a forum as a part of the Verizon website if the questions and issues raised in that forum  -  repeatedly - and which indicate a clear desire for a service to be provided - remains ignored by Verizon?  I would suspect that even "limited interaction from Verizon employees"  would recognize the importance of this issue to their customers;   and I would hope that by having a community forum as a part of their website, the company would possibly from time to time show some interest in what their community of customers is talking about.

There seems to be some confusion about what a service company is.

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Re: Robocalls. Why, Verizon?

rcschnoor
Líder Sénior

LKJjk wrote:

rcschnoor wrote:

The fact many people give up landline based phones to go with strictly a cell phone would lead one to believe this is NOT a feature that cell phone providers would be willing to invest in.

I don't follow your logic.  How do you make that conclusion?

Landline providers have invested in simultaneous ring simply based upon the fact that a MAJOR portion of their customers are NOT at home where they can answer the call. It is beneficial for the customer to be able to answer the call regardless where they are at the time. If customers continue to miss calls, they may rethink their continued use of a landline phone service. Therefore, it is beneficial to the digital landline provider that their customers are able to answer the call even when they are away from home. THAT is why they have invested in simultaneous ring technology.

People who give up a landline and go STRICTLY with a cell phone, don't necessarily have the same problem with their phone ringing and not being able to answer it because they are not within reach of their phone.  I have NEVER heard of someone giving up their cellphone to go strictly with landline based phone service. Therefore, cell phone providers don't see the same need to invest in this technology.

THAT is my logic.

Nomorobo has taken advantage of this technology which digital landline providers have invested in. Cellular providers don't necessarily see the advantage in this investment because THEIR customers are normally within reach of their phone and don't necessarily need to have the call ring in another location.

Because Nomorobo requires this technology to work does not mean cellular providers should foot the bill for this technology investment in order for Nomorobo to benefit at the expense of another company. Possibly you should petition Nomorobo to provide the infrastructure to cellular providers so they can provide the service they advertise. I don't see it the responsibility of cellular providers to invest in this technology when the MOST IMPORTANT reason to do so would be to benefit Nomorobo,

You may have another opinion. You are entitled to it. We simply disagree.

Re: Robocalls. Why, Verizon?

LKJjk
Miembro

Ah, HA!  An EXPLANATION!  THANK you!

All is revealed, and now I understand.   All that had been missing was an explanation of what simultaneous ring is all about, and now I see why it would not be a pragmatic choice for cellular.  So you are right.

My apologies, but this could have been cleared up much earlier if my original question  ("exactly WHY does nomorobo NOT work?") had been answered with as much clarity...   by anyone.

So, yes.  Perhaps it is more appropriate to have Nomorobo themselves propose a further solution, but if their only solution is utterly dependent on simultaneous ring, then maybe trying to work with that is futile, and some other entirely different concept is required.

Still doesn't tell me why Verizon has had nothing to say, and nothing to offer.  But thanks for your explanation.  

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Re: Robocalls. Why, Verizon?

kaebfly
Leader

Apple does the same thing in their community forums. So does every other carrier that has a community forum. It is NOT a tech support site although on a support forum every one tries to help each other out. For actual tech support you need to contact Verizon (or Apple, or whoever would actually provide specific tech support for your issues and questions) directly. That way an actual tech support person can directly address your specific questions or needs and provide support. A forum does not do that. Not in the same sense. A community forum is not a uncommon thing and this one works pretty much like every other one.

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Re: Re: Robocalls. Why, Verizon?

angelsix
Miembro

"Therefore, it is beneficial to the digital landline provider that their customers are able to answer the call even when they are away from home."

I.e., it is beneficial to the digital landline provider to provide services that accommodate their customers' needs.  The providers don't do this because they care about the feelings of their customers; the providers do this to prevent their customers from changing to a carrier that provides a desired service.

With the explosion of robocalls, wireless provider customers now need robocall blocking.  As long as the cellular industry all sticks together to preclude customers using Nomorobo, we customers have no reason to switch.  Sooner or later I expect that some upstart wireless provider will make some change so that their customers can use Nomorobo.  Then that provider can advertise "Switch to us, and you can block robo-calls for free."  When those adds go up, I predict that they will be effective.  Then, suddenly, it will become "beneficial to the (other) digital landline provider(s)" to provide this service for the only reason they care about ... it will affect their bottom line.  The first carrier to make the switch would get the benefit of appearing to care about their customers needs more than other carriers although, really, all corporations can care about is the profit they make from their customers.

Re: Robocalls. Why, Verizon?

Mkristi
Miembro

I am on the do not contact list I am getting 20 calls a day from numbers that say New York Arizona Kentucky when I call back it's an invalid number if answered it's a person from another country how can this be stopped why does Verizon wireless not allow Nomorobo as an option for wireless I do not and should not have to change my number what can be done

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Re: Robocalls. Why, Verizon?

sprmankalel
Leader

For everyone: Stop putting your phone number in every website available. Don't put it on Facebook which tracks your browsing history to provide you relevant advertisements. I am sure that Facebook has sold your number on a list to their advertisers who are now calling you to push their services. Just a guess. Facebook is a slimy that way. I have not read their TOS but I wouldn't be surprised if we have agreed to FB selling our numbers.

I probably get about 2-3 of these calls a week. The beauty of my phone is that I have the choice to answer or not. Anyone who needs me will send me a text and won't be calling. If I don't know the number I don't answer it. No big deal. However, I wholly believe that you are getting these calls is because in some TOS somewhere you have agreed to your number being sold to some other company by a company that you do business with. So stop adding it to your social media profiles. It may it easier for your friends to find you but it also makes it easier for companies with a product to sell to find you.

Re: Robocalls. Why, Verizon?

Mkristi
Miembro

Actually I have no Facebook I have no social media accounts

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