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Home Broadband Fusion Typical High Power Consumption

Miembro

Pregunta: Has anyone noticed just how much power (watts) the Verizon outside Cantenna and HBR router consume if left on continuously, even while you are not using it?

Fact: I took a measuring device and finding the outside attenna and router plug-ins consumer over 130 watts if continually left on. But what makes matter worse is there is no indication when you sign up this very little known fact.. so.. left on an average consumer burns about the same amount of electricity with the antenna and router as a small kitchen refrigerator or about 6-7 KWH (Kila-Watt Hours) per day.. if your electricity rates are .12 cents per KWH then it costs about 75 cents a day or 23 dollars in a month to power just these devices..

What to do? - TURN OFF when not in use or completely power down. The down side is are there side effects by doing so?

Somebody should launch a complaint to Verizon and to consumer affairs for not being obligated to advertising these facts (it would sort of be like buying a car and not knowing what kind of gas milage you would be getting).

Most folks using these products should see an obivous jump in their regular electric bills.

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Re: Home Broadband Fusion Typical High Power Consumption

Leader

You bring forth an interesting subject Germantown.

I do not have access to HomeFusion but have often wondered the same thing.  A high powered antenna and amplifier is bound to consume a noticeable amount of electricity.  So far no one has posted any statistics on it until now.

I wouldn't suppose that the common Verizon Sales rep would be trained in the arts of home power consumption and conservation.  Doesn't seem like something a trained rep would bother trying to explain to new users.  Power bills are different for each area too.  Electricity costs 10 cents/KWH around where I live.

Still, asking for a notification or something that states the power requirements for the device and service would be helpful.  A new car may not be a good comparision as you stated above, gas milage is not a requirement for vehicles.  However, all new home appliances do advertise there power levels on them to give consumers an idea of the imact they will have on the power bill.  For example a new fridge, TV or electric stove would have an energy star rating posted on a sticker on the box or display piece on the showroom floor.

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Re: Home Broadband Fusion Typical High Power Consumption

germantown wrote:

Pregunta: Has anyone noticed just how much power (watts) the Verizon outside Cantenna and HBR router consume if left on continuously, even while you are not using it?

Fact: I took a measuring device and finding the outside attenna and router plug-ins consumer over 130 watts if continually left on. But what makes matter worse is there is no indication when you sign up this very little known fact.. so.. left on an average consumer burns about the same amount of electricity with the antenna and router as a small kitchen refrigerator or about 6-7 KWH (Kila-Watt Hours) per day.. if your electricity rates are .12 cents per KWH then it costs about 75 cents a day or 23 dollars in a month to power just these devices..

You're math is off. 130 watts means it uses 130 watts per hour that's 3120 watts in a day or 3.12 kW. Or 93.6 kW in a month. At 12 cents per kW that's $11.23 a month not $23. Also you assume it uses that much electricity 24/7

Also new refrigerators even large ones use maybe $6 a month in electricity.

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Re: Home Broadband Fusion Typical High Power Consumption

Leader

Nice catch anonymous,

I would think that even if a fridge runs at 6-7 KWH/day it is not consistently doing so.  A new fridge should be efficient and only cool when it needs to.  When it meets the temp requirements I'm sure it will revert back to a low power state until it is needed again.  Anything that is Energy Star rated tends to have a low power mode or feature similar to that.

However, an always on Internet connection like HomeFusion may be configured to broadcast at the same level all day long.  That would ensure a speedy response instead of the usual Dormant/Active mechanism built into Mobile Hotspots and cell phones.  If that is the case then all you can really do to tone down the power consumption is to power it on and off as needed.

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Re: Home Broadband Fusion Typical High Power Consumption

Well unless there is some reason why powering it down at night or whenever you're not going to use it for a long time is bad why wouldn't you do it? At least the router part. For the record the router and modem I use for my cable internet connection use about 40 watts combined.

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Re: Home Broadband Fusion Typical High Power Consumption

Leader

I'd assume that the home router is not the power drain.  The HF routers are nothing special from what I have seen other than they can interface with the amplifier and antenna system.  Should you remove the amplifier I'd assume the HF router would continue to operate like a normal home router.

Instead I would assume the high powered antenna and amplifier equipment is drawing all the juice.  Afterall the wireless signal from your house to the towers travels a much longer distance than the router to your computer.  It would only make sense that the power required to broadcast that distance is porportionatly/exponentially more too.

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