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Re: Returning my (2) Droid Incredibles and going back to AT&T iPhones

dirkbonn
Sr. Member

general034 wrote:

I decide to get rid of my iphones because of constant dropped calls on AT&T service in NYC area. However I was only able to tolerate the Incredible for 7 days before switching back to AT&T and my iPhones. Here are the reasons:

 

1) Call Quality- The call quality on the HTC Incredible was horrible on both my devices. I don't attribute this to Verizon and think it has to be on the HTC end. I spoke with a Verizon Corp store yesterday and they said that HTC is working on a ROM update to fix this issue and there is no current ETA. What happens is on calls the sound gets scratchy and is very difficult to hear and words that come over the line keep dropping. So if someone is speaking you only hear about every other word. It is extremely annoying and I can't believe that HTC and Verizon would release a phone with such a defect.  Since there is no ETA for a fix I'm going back to my iphone since the calls are always crystal clear and the service sometimes intermittent. Here is  the link to a thread on HTC about the issue.

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Notice how in the space of just a few sentences his iPhones on AT&T went from CONSTANT dropped calls to SOMETIMES intermittant.

How many of the hundreds of thousands of Incredible phones out there have you seen complaining about call quality?  Let's see, your logic is,  a low quality connection on Verizon is worse than NO connection on AT&T!   C'mon guy.... You knew you were going to go back to the iPhone before you left AT&T, right?





 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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Re: Returning my (2) Droid Incredibles and going back to AT&T iPhones

TallGuy1970
Miembro

 


kenyu73 wrote:

The post is a copy/paste iPhone solicitor..... anyone who visits a forum, posts 1 SINGLE huge essay of a negative review is a anti-android forum troll...

 

Nuff said. :smileywink:

 


I have to agree with this post! I bounce back and forth between the AT&T boards and the VZW boards. The number of one-time trollish posts is amazing, especially between iPhone and Android. It reminds me of the Chevy vs. Ford debate.

 

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Re: Returning my (2) Droid Incredibles and going back to AT&T iPhones

KaLin
Novice

Hey everyone,

 

Let's keep the thread on topic, please.

 

¡Gracias!

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Re: Returning my (2) Droid Incredibles and going back to AT&T iPhones

M91-30
Novice

 


KaLin wrote:

Hey everyone,

 

Let's keep the thread on topic, please.

 

¡Gracias!


this whole thread has been 100% on topic so far. some people like android OS, some like iphone, some like windows mobile, ect... but the OP seems to come on here for one purpose (litterally, since they only posted one post) and that is to spread {word filter avoidance}trying to get more people to leave verizon to go to AT&T.

 

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Re: Returning my (2) Droid Incredibles and going back to AT&T iPhones

ivorycruncher
Novice

 


M91-30 wrote:

 

iphone, you revolutionized NOTHING but are idol-ed like a god.


I love Android and dislike Apple as much as the next guy, but I disagree with that statement.  Take an honest look at where smartphones were at before the iPhone, and now look where they are today.  There is no denying the fact that the iPhone made a statement, a statement which caused a complete overhaul of the smartphone market.  Before it, there were the same, ugly old Windows Mobile 6.1 phones and tired old Blackberrys.  Oh, and Palms, but those were dying out regardless.  After the iPhone, all of a sudden there was a quite sudden and rapid upswing of Android development, Microsoft suddenly woke up and rushed the WinMo 6.5 refresh to market with the promise of big things in 7.0, WebOS came out of seemingly nowhere, and even the Blackberry, after the 5.0 refresh, is getting a complete overhaul in 6.0, which looks like it will finally be worthy of competing with the smartphone of today.

 

Now, you can argue that some of these projects were started long before the iPhone ever came to market, which might be true, but again, Apple didn't just raise the bar.  No, they practically invented a new game.  I honestly don't believe that smartphones would have evolved half has far as they have between the original iPhone release date and present day, had it not been for that device.  The iPhone has done to the smartphone world what the iPod did to the portable music player world.  Apple is extremely good at taking an existing concept, reinventing it, and making it super-cool again.  After all, Sony started the portable music craze with the original Walkman, but does anybody at all think about a Sony Walkman when thinking about portable music players?  No, you say mp3 player, and everyone instantly visualizes an iPod.  That brand name has become 100% synonymous with portable music.  Their goal was the same with the iPhone, to say "smartphone" and have everyone instantly think of the iPhone.  Now, I don't believe they have been QUITE as successful with the iPhone as they were with the iPod, but it is still a huge success by any measure.  And I believe I can safely say that just about every single one of us believes deep down that, despite all its faults, or the faults of the company that built it, it really is a great piece of technology.

 

With all that said, I still believe the iPhone could have been even bigger than it is, had Apple's (or should I say Jobs') arrogance not kept getting in the way.  I'm sure AT&T can share some of the blame as well, but it's mostly on Apple.  Despite having the brilliance to create a device that would spur a ridiculous amount of fast-paced growth in a particular market, I very much dislike Apple's business practices.  I believe they are as bad, if not worse, that Microsoft on its darkest day.  Their level of walled-garden integration goes far beyond anything Microsoft ever achieved, and have only been allowed to do so due to lack of market share.  However, that's not going to hold out much longer, as we see there are already antitrust lawsuits being filed against Apple in the realm of digital music sales.  If they could just figure out how to stop telling their customers what they should want, and start listening to what they actually do want, then I believe we'd see a whole new Apple.  If Apple operated like Google, they would probably be much more of a mainstream choice in computing, not still an expensive, niche option.  They lost a HUGE opportunity when they shut down Psystar, a company who was producing Mac clones that were much more powerful for a fraction of the cost of the real thing.  Apple insists on maintaining their luxury brand status, and are excluding themselves from a huge chunk of the PC market because of it.  And as for the iPhone and/or Apple being idolized, I very much disagree with that.  I love my Android phone, but at the end of the day, it's just a phone.  I do not worship it or the companies that made it.

 

Of course, now Google has entered the game along with Apple and Microsoft, bringing for the first time a very viable Linux-based platform to the table.  Ubuntu was the best Linux option to date, but despite efforts by Dell, it just never took off much outside of geek territory.  Lots of people returned the Dell Mini netbooks, once they found out that they ran Ubuntu instead of Windows.  It was just too much of an unknown to the general populace.  Linux needed a corporate giant with a great reputation and virtually unlimited resources to give it a chance, and Google has done just that.  In fact, I think it's actually better that they started small, with smartphones, instead of trying to break right out onto the desktop PC scene.  On a phone, consumers don't have to worry about hardware compatibility, device drivers, etc., and can use the time to get familiar with the platform.  And though it's currently limited to smartphones and MIDs, it will be on tablets and netbooks soon enough, and I believe it's only a matter of time until it enters the desktop arena (commercially, not by hacks) to compete head to head with Windows and Mac OS.  If the app store concept is maintained, Linux will finally be simple enough for general consumers to use.  Linux distros have had package managers for years, but let's face it, they are all ugly and difficult to understand and use.  People should not have to be bothered with strange dependancy warnings for packages they know nothing about, and they should never, EVER have to know what a compiler or source code libraries are.  What the consumer needs is "here's an app for your computer, click the button to install it".  I will give an honorable mention to Linspire, as they actually developed a true app store for Linux, and a fairly user-friendly interface.  However, I think it tried too hard to mimic Windows, and with the company being the startup it was, just didn't have the resources to make it big.  Google, on the other hand, has about as much marketing power as Apple (if not moreso), and instead of trying to make everything run like Windows, has created something new and different, yet simple to use.

 

I know a desktop version of Android will have to get much more complex, just as the hardware and applications are more complex, but I can see it happening.  As long as they keep it simple enough for the general population to use, yet allow the geeks to get under the hood and do the equivalent of tuner transformations at will, I believe they will have a big winner.  Anyway, here's to the future Android.  The future looks exciting indeed.  :smileywink:

 

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Re: Returning my (2) Droid Incredibles and going back to AT&T iPhones

fezzik
Novice

For what it is worth Dell still sells Ubuntu computers.  It is still the most popular outside of the Geek community.  It is great and easy but almost as bloated as Windows which reduces the advantages.  Linux for smartphones had been around for a while and they had been really pushing to get going.  Motorola was one of the major players in that movement but abandoned it for Android.  Android has the advantage of marketing that other Linux distrobutions just don't have.  All this before Google has even released its first Linux OS (Chrome is still scheduled to come out soon but has been put off again oddly though Android has been implemented in many of the original Chrome intended platforms so Android may replace Chrome or Chrome may end up being a broadened (inclusion of terminal operations) OS). For what it is worth I dig Synaptic on Ubuntu that and the way APT-GET just works is one of the reasons I prefer Debian based systems to RedHat based Systems. 

 

Apple really has innovated, and like them or not AT&T really took a chance on picking them up.  iPhone was a long shot and it took control away from the service providers.  Because of that it was a hard sell.  They pushed it hard despite rejections from all of the major carriers.  AT&T eventually changed their tune and took a chance.  When they did they made money.  Lots of money.  They learned and taught many lessons to everyone else about how it has to work and suddenly (or slowly over a few years time) the other networks started to open up and take chances.  Blackberry introduced an App market and devkits.  WebOS hit Palm and was short lived.  Then Android got picked up by little T-Mobile. 

 

I read about the iPhone a year before it was ever picked up.  I followed as it bounced from carrier to carrier with great interest.  I wasn't a fan of iPods because of the one way file transfer heavily restrictive DRM and other non-essential highly restrictive self imposed limitations it had over all the competition and wondered why a little device with one control wheel limited interface and heavy restrictions would possibly beat out every other digital media player on the market.  But the iPhone represented a step.  If someone picked it up it would change the face of mobile communication for the better.  AT&T picked it up which was good they were one of the biggest networks and at the time it was kind of teetering between AT&T and Verizon for largest network so a network that large taking this kind of chance was excellent.  The question was would they make any money at it or would the expense and sacrifice overcome the massive new customer influx.  Would they choke on non-network provided software and the insane network demands of a fully web capable device.  The answer yes they did and have at the launch of each new iPhone model but the costs did not prove to outweigh the profits infact quite the opposite.  A guinnea pig tested and survived the rest of the market scrambled. 

 

A few years ago Google was just a search engine provider with a few cool features and apps.  Gmail was wicked cool and it was followed by a series of neat web offerings.  Rumors and gossip and wishful thinking had suggested they would create their own opperating system.  Google denied even the ambition much less the intention.  Google Chrome internet browser hit the scene and it was ok but nothing overly exciting really in the overall scheme of things it was a lot like Apple's  browser but the rumors abounded.  Finally Google announced they were in fact working on a cloud based operating system to be called Google Chrome OS.  It was coming along and demonstrations of it looked cool.  Of course Linux based being Google but simple and pretty well connected.  Outstanding.  Then the wait.  Eventually they announced Android for smartphones and said it would come out first.  The official release came and no one picked it up.  Too soon to know how the iPhone experiment would go and too hard of a sell really.  After a year or so T-Mobile picked it up with a little Taiwan company HTC.  It was insanely popular and the marketing was so cool.  By the time it had been out a year T-Mobile had more than 2 Android phones Sprint and Verizon were in a race to launch their first.  As we are just a few short months from the 3rd anniversary of Android's unveiling, it's second anniversary on the market, and its first anniversary on Verizon Android is already outselling iPhone which had almost 18months to establish itself  in the market before little T-Mobile introduced the first Android handset. 

 

This month is 3 years of iPhone and look at how far the market has come.  Smartphones were for nerds and business men before that now even I, a poor working class schmuck in Tennessee, carry a phone more advanced than the computers I used in college. 

 

Yeah it innovated and the new iPhone may promise to bring about yet another revolution introducing x86 processing to smartphones which will open up a whole new world of processing power.  Soon to be eclipsed by the Android devices following on its heals with the same chipsets.  The smartphone world may be the one where iWhatever products limitations finally set them back instead of propel them.  I just hope that Android is a small step to a true linux phone with terminal operations and the like. 

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